1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, short ovoid- to coccus-shaped, aerobic, non-flagellated, and nonmotile strain, designated WN007, was isolated from the natural saline–alkali wetland soil. Growth occurred at 10–45 °C (optimum 33–37 °C), pH 6.5–10.0 (optimum, pH 7.5–8.0) and with 0–15 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 2–4 % NaCl). Catalase- and oxidase-positive. A comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of WN007 showed the highest sequence similarities to Paracoccus chinensis (97.5 %) and Paracoccus niistensis (97.4 %). The major respiratory quinone of strain WN007 was Q10 and the fatty acid profile of strain WN007 contained a predominant amount of summed feature 7 and small quantities of C10 : 0 3OH, C16 : 00 and C18 : 00. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, glycolipid, aminolipid and lipid. The genome revealed that the G+C content was 63.9 mol% and the DNA–DNA relatedness values between strain WN007 and the type strains of P. chinensis CGMCC 1.7655and P. niistensis KCTC 22789 were 46.9±2.3 and 42.4±1.7 %, respectively. This was also confirmed by the low average nucleotide identity values (<83.5 %) between strain WN007 and the most closely related recognized Paracoccus species. According to these results, strain WN007 represents a novel species of the genus Paracoccus , for which the name Paracoccus salipaludis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is WN007 (=KCTC 52851=ACCC 19972).

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2018-10-16
2019-10-19
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