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Abstract

Strain FW-11 was isolated from oil-contaminated soil from Panjin in Liaoning, China. It was a Gram-stain-negative, aerobic and rod-shaped bacterium. The strain was confirmed to be a member of the genus Sphingomonas based on phylogenetic inference and phenotypic characteristics. The best growth of strain FW-11 occurred at 30 °C and pH 6.0–7.0. The strain was non-spore-forming, catalase-negative and oxidase-negative. The main polar lipids were sphingoglycolipid, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and unidentified lipids. The cell-wall peptidoglycan of strain FW-11 included alanine, glycine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid and meso-diaminopimelate. The predominant isoprenoid quinones were ubiquinone Q-10 (93.2 %) and Q-9 (6.8 %). The fatty acid profile (>5 %) included C18 : 1ω6c (43.1 %), C16 : 0 (14.6 %), C17 : 1ω6c (14.0 %) and C14 : 0 2-OH (11.1 %). The most similar neighbours of FW-11 were Sphingomonas fennica K101 (97.4 %) and Sphingomonas haloaromaticamans A175 (97.0 %). The average nucleotide identity relatedness values between strain FW-11 and the two type strains ( S. fennica K101 and S. haloaromaticamans A175) were 73.2 and 75.3 %, respectively. The genome size of FW-11 was 3.8 Mbp, comprising 3735 predicted genes with a DNA G+C content of 64.0 mol%. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain FW-11 represents a novel species of the genus Sphingomonas , for which the name Sphingomonas oleivorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is FW-11 (=LMG 29274=HAMBI 3659).

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2018-09-25
2019-08-19
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