1887

Abstract

A Gram-negative, aerobic, non-motile, non-spore-forming and rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated SK3863, was isolated from rotten biji (residue remaining after making tofu). This bacterium was characterized in order to determine its taxonomic position by using the polyphasic approach. Strain SK3863 grew well at 25–37 °C on Reasoner’s 2A agar plates. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain SK3863 belonged to the family Comamonadaceae and was related to Ottowia beijingensis GCS-AN-3 (96.5 % sequence similarity) and Ottowia pentelensis RB3-7 (96.4 %). Lower sequence similarities (96.2 %) were found to all of the other recognized members of the genus Ottowia . The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 65.8 mol%. The major respiratory lipoquinone was ubiquinone 8 and the major fatty acids were C16 : 1 ω6c/C16 : 1ω7c, C16 : 0 and C18 : 1 ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c. Strain SK3863 could be differentiated genotypically and phenotypically from the recognized species of the genus Ottowia . The isolate therefore represents a novel species, for which the name Ottowia konkukae sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain SK3863 (=KCCM 43236=DSM 105395).

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2018-09-17
2019-08-18
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