1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-endospore-forming, motile by a polar flagellum, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain DHOG02, which produced yellow-pigmented colonies, was isolated from a soil sample collected from the lower subtropical forest of the Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, Guangdong Province, PR China. Strain DHOG02 grew at 12–37 °C, pH 4–9 and 0–4 % (w/v) NaCl, with optima at 28 °C, pH 6–7 and 0.5 % (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that this strain formed a clade with Dyella lipolytica DHOB07 and Dyella jejuensis JP1, with sequence similarities of 98.0 and 97.4 %, respectively. The result of the concatenated partial gyrB, lepA and recA gene sequence analysis confirmed that strain DHOG02 belongs to the genus Dyella, but is distinct from all currently known species of the genus. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 62 mol%. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unidentified aminophospholipid and phospholipid. Ubiquinone-8 was the only respiratory quinone detected, and iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 1 ω9c and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1 ω6c and/or C16 : 1 ω7c) were the major fatty acids, all of which supported the affiliation of strain DHOG02 to the genus Dyella . On the basis of the evidence presented here, strain DHOG02 represents a novel species of the genus Dyella , for which the name Dyella halodurans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DHOG02 (=NBRC 111474=CGMCC 1.15435).

Keyword(s): Dyella , housekeeping gene and phylogeny
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2018-08-20
2020-09-23
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