1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, motile and rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated 102-Na3, was isolated from sediment of Sinduri beach in Taean, Republic of Korea. Strain 102-Na3 grew optimally at 28–37 °C, at pH 7.0–11.0 and in the presence of 1–3 % (w/v) NaCl, but NaCl was not an absolute requirement for growth. The neighbour-joining phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain 102-Na3 joined the clade comprising the type strains of Oceanimonas species. Strain 102-Na3 exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 98.8, 98.3 and 98.0 % to the type strains of Oceanimonas doudoroffii MBIC1298, Oceanimonas baumannii GB6 and Oceanimonas smirnovii 31-13, respectively. Strain 102-Na3 contained summed feature 3 (comprising C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c), summed feature 8 (comprising C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c), C16 : 0 and C12 : 0 as major fatty acids. The major quinone was ubiquinone-8. The polar lipids were composed of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and two unidentified amino lipids. The DNA G+C content was 56.8 mol%. Strain 102-Na3 exhibited DNA–DNA relatedness values of 25.7, 21.7 and 14.8 % to the type strains of O. doudoroffii , O. baumannii and O. smirnovii , respectively. Differential phenotypic properties, together with its phylogenetic and genetic distinctiveness, revealed that strain 102-Na3 is separated from recognized species of the genus Oceanimonas . On the basis of the data presented, strain 102-Na3 (=KCTC 62271=JCM 32358=DSM 106032) is considered the type strain of a novel species of the genus Oceanimonas , for which the name Oceanimonas marisflavi sp. nov. is proposed.

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2018-07-24
2019-12-08
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