1887

Abstract

A strictly anaerobic, Gram-staining-positive, spore-forming rod-shaped bacterium, and designated BXX, was isolated from cow manure. Colonies on DSMZ medium 311c agar plates were cream, circular, opaque and lustrous. Growth occurred at 20–45 °C with a pH range of 5.0–10.0 and at NaCl concentrations of up to 2 % (w/v). The optimum temperature, pH and NaCl concentration for growth were 30 °C, pH 7 and 1 % (w/v), respectively. The major cellular fatty acids were C16 : 0 (26.8 %), C14 : 0 (22.8 %), summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) (16.4 %) and C16 : 1ω9c (10.7 %). The main polar lipids of BXX were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, unidentified aminolipids, an unidentified phospholipid and unidentified lipids. Acetate was mainly produced from H2/CO2, H2/CO2/CO (4/3/3, v/v/v), formate, glycerol, 1,2-propanediol, pyruvate, d-fructose and 2-methoxyethanol. BXX is most closely related to Clostridium thermobutyricum DSM 4928, Clostridium homopropionicum DSM 5847 and Clostridium thermopalmarium DSM 5974 with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 96.9, 96.6 and 96.5 %, respectively. The DNA G+C content of BXX was 33.7 mol%, which was lower than that of C. thermobutyricum DSM 4928 (37.0 mol%) and C. thermopalmarium DSM 5974 (35.7 mol%). In addition, DSM 4928 and DSM 5974are thermophilic members of the genus Clostridium . The absence of C15 : 0 also distinguished BXX from Clostridium thermobutyricum . On the basis of phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic evidence, the novel isolate represents a novel species within the genus Clostridium , for which the name Clostridium bovifaecis sp. nov is proposed. The type strain of the type species is BXX (=JCM 32382=CGMCC 1.5228).

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2018-07-30
2019-10-17
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