1887

Abstract

A novel Gram-staining-negative, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterial strain ZQBW, which was isolated from a diuron-polluted soil collected near Nanjing, PR China, was investigated for its taxonomic position by a polyphasic approach. ZQBW grew well at pH 6.0–12.0 (optimum, pH 7.0), 26–35 °C (optimum, 30 °C) and up to 0.5 % NaCl (optimally the absence of NaCl) in R2A broth. The major fatty acids of ZQBW were C18 : 1ω7c (82.7 %) and C18 : 0 (5.3 %). The polar lipid profile included the major compounds phophatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylmethylethanolamine. The only respiratory quinone was ubiquinone Q-10. The G+C content of genomic DNA was 67.0 mol%. Comparisons with 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that ZQBW has the highest sequence similarities with members of the genus Tabrizicola (≤95.97 %), followed by Rhodobacter (≤95.96 %) and Falsirhodobacter (95.95 %) which all belong to the family Rhodobacteraceae in the phylum Proteobacteria . Photosynthesis genes pufLM were not found and photosynthesis pigments were not formed in ZQBW. On the basis of the results from chemotaxonomic, phenotypic and phylogenetic analysis, ZQBW represents a novel species of a novel genus, for which the name Xinfangfangia soli gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ZQBW (=KCTC 62102=CCTCC AB 2017177).

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2018-06-27
2019-10-16
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