1887

Abstract

Two aerobic and obligately acidophilic bacteria, designated HZ411 and 4MSH08, were isolated from the forest soil of Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, Guangdong Province, PR China (23° 10′ N, 112° 31′ E). These two strains were Gram-stain-negative short rods that multiplied by binary division. HZ411 was motile, with a single polar flagellum, but 4MSH08 was non-motile. The results of the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that these two strains formed a common clade with members of the genus Edaphobacter in subdivision 1 of the phylum Acidobacteria but they each occupied a unique position in the genus. HZ411 and 4MSH08 had a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 96.2 % between each other and the highest sequence similarity of 97.7 and 96.9 % to Edaphobacter modestus Jbg-1 and Edaphobacter aggregans Wbg-1, respectively. The DNA–DNA hybridization rate between HZ411 and E. modestus Jbg-1 was 22.7 %. The DNA G+C contents of HZ411 and 4MSH08 were 57.7 and 59.3 %, respectively. HZ411 and 4MSH08 had similar major (>10 %) fatty acids with very high percentages of iso-C15 : 0 and C16 : 1ω7c, and similar major polar lipid profiles (both contained a phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidyldimethylethanolamine and glycolipid and several unidentified aminolipids and polar lipids). On the basis of these physiological, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic data, we suggest that HZ411 and 4MSH08 represent two novel species of the genus Edaphobacter , for which the names Edaphobacter flagellatus HZ411 (=GDMCC 1.1193=LMG 30085) and Edaphobacter bradus 4MSH08 (=GDMCC 1.1317=KCTC 62475) are proposed.

Keyword(s): acidophilic , Edaphobacter and phylogeny
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.002871
2018-06-29
2019-08-18
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/ijsem/68/8/2530.html?itemId=/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.002871&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Janssen PH. Identifying the dominant soil bacterial taxa in libraries of 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes. Appl Environ Microbiol 2006;72:1719–1728 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Janssen PH, Yates PS, Grinton BE, Taylor PM, Sait M. Improved culturability of soil bacteria and isolation in pure culture of novel members of the divisions Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia. Appl Environ Microbiol 2002;68:2391–2396 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Jones RT, Robeson MS, Lauber CL, Hamady M, Knight R et al. A comprehensive survey of soil acidobacterial diversity using pyrosequencing and clone library analyses. ISME J 2009;3:442–453 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Mardanov AV, Beletsky AV, Nikolaev Y, Kotlyarov RY, Kallistova A et al. Metagenome of the microbial community of anammox granules in a nitritation/anammox wastewater treatment system. Genome Announc 2017;5:e01115-17 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Lv B, Cui Y, Tian W, Feng D. Composition and influencing factors of bacterial communities in ballast tank sediments: implications for ballast water and sediment management. Mar Environ Res 2017;132:14–22 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Polymenakou PN, Lampadariou N, Mandalakis M, Tselepides A. Phylogenetic diversity of sediment bacteria from the southern Cretan margin, Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Syst Appl Microbiol 2009;32:17–26 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Thrash JC, Coates JD. Phylum XVII. Acidobacteria phyl. nov. In Krieg NR, Staley JT, Brown DR, Hedlund BP, Paster BJ et al. (editors) Bergey’s Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, 2nd ed.vol. 4 New York: Springer; 2010; pp.725–727
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Koch IH, Gich F, Dunfield PF, Overmann J. Edaphobacter modestus gen. nov., sp. nov., and Edaphobacter aggregans sp. nov., acidobacteria isolated from alpine and forest soils. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2008;58:1114–1122 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Wang J, Chen MH, Lv YY, Jiang YW, Qiu LH. Edaphobacter dinghuensis sp. nov., an acidobacterium isolated from lower subtropical forest soil. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2016;66:276–282 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Xia F, Cai YM, Chen DX, Qiu LH. Edaphobacter acidisoli sp. nov., an acidobacterium isolated from forest soil. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2017;67:4260–4265 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Belova SE, Suzina NE, Rijpstra WIC, Sinninghe Damsté JS, Dedysh SN. Edaphobacter lichenicola sp. nov., a member of the family Acidobacteriaceae from lichen-dominated forested tundra. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2018;1265–1270 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Hiraishi A, Kitamura H. Distribution of phototrophic purple nonsulfur bacteria in activated sludge systems and other aquatic environments. Nippon Suisan Gakkaishi 1984;50:1929–1937 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Mo J, Brown S, Peng S, Kong G. Nitrogen availability in disturbed, rehabilitated and mature forests of tropical China. For Ecol Manage 2003;175:573–583 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Liu C, Zuo W, Zhao Z, Qiu L. Bacterial diversity of different successional stage forest soils in Dinghushan. Wei Sheng Wu Xue Bao 2012;52:1489–1496[PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Hiraishi A, Nagashima KV, Matsuura K, Shimada K, Takaichi S et al. Phylogeny and photosynthetic features of Thiobacillus acidophilus and related acidophilic bacteria: its transfer to the genus Acidiphilium as Acidiphilium acidophilum comb. nov. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1998;48:1389–1398 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Buck JD. Nonstaining (KOH) method for determination of gram reactions of marine bacteria. Appl Environ Microbiol 1982;44:992–993[PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Kuykendall LD, Roy MA, O'Neill JJ, Devine TE. Fatty acids, antibiotic resistance, and deoxyribonucleic acid homology groups of Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1988;38:358–361 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Minnikin DE, O'Donnell AG, Goodfellow M, Alderson G, Athalye M et al. An integrated procedure for the extraction of bacterial isoprenoid quinones and polar lipids. J Microbiol Methods 1984;2:233–241 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Mesbah M, Premachandran U, Whitman WB. Precise measurement of the G+C content of deoxyribonucleic acid by high-performance liquid chromatography. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1989;39:159–167 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Christensen H, Angen O, Mutters R, Olsen JE, Bisgaard M. DNA–DNA hybridization determined in micro-wells using covalent attachment of DNA. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2000;50:1095–1102 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Ezaki T, Hashimoto Y, Yabuuchi E. Fluorometric deoxyribonucleic acid–deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization in microdilution wells as an alternative to membrane filter hybridization in which radioisotopes are used to determine genetic relatedness among bacterial strains. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1989;39:224–229 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Wayne LG, Brenner DJ, Colwell RR, Grimont PAD, Kandler O et al. International Committee on Systematic Bacteriology. Report of the ad hoc committee on reconciliation of approaches to bacterial systematics. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1987;37:463–464
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Stackebrandt E, Goebel BM. Taxonomic Note: a place for DNA–DNA reassociation and 16S rRNA sequence analysis in the present species definition in bacteriology. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 1994;44:846–849 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.002871
Loading
/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.002871
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Supplementary File 2

PDF

Most Cited This Month

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error