1887

Abstract

A bacterial strain, designated 4GSKX, isolated from the forest soil of Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, Guangdong Province, PR China (112° 31′ E 23° 10′ N), is proposed as a novel species of the genus . Cells of strain 4GSKX were aerobic, non-motile, Gram-stain-negative short rods that multiplied by binary division. The strain grew at 12–37 °C (optimum, 25–30 °C), pH 4.0–6.5 (optimum, pH 4.5–5.0) and NaCl concentrations of 0–1.0 % (w/v; optimum, 0 %). Strain 4GSKX utilized various carbon sources as growth substrates, including both sugars and amino acids. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were iso-C (48.8 %) and iso-Cω9/C 10-methyl (14.7 %). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, an unidentified glycolipid, three unidentified phospholipids and two unidentified aminophospholipids. The only quinone detected was MK-8 and the DNA G+C content was 52.8 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain 4GSKX belongs to the genus in the family in subdivision 1 of the phylum Acidobacteria, with the highest similarity of 97.1 % to WH120. Based on all phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data obtained, it is proposed as a novel species of genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed, with 4GSKX (=CGMCC 1.15449=LMG 29213) as the type strain.

Keyword(s): Acidicapsa , acidophilic and phylogeny
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2018-07-01
2020-01-26
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