1887

Abstract

There was an error in the proposed genus name in the published article, in that the genus 'Salinivirga' was effectively published while this article was in review. Therefore, the genus 'Salinivirga' should be replaced with 'Saliniramus'. For the convenience of future readers, we have included the complete corrected article below, in which all occurrences of the incorrect genus name have been amended: A halophilic bacterial strain, HL-109, was isolated from the unicyanobacterial consortium UCC-O, which was obtained from the photosynthetic mat of Hot Lake (Washington, USA). A polyphasic approach using phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic data was used to classify the strain within the order Rhizobiales . The organism stained Gram-negative and was a moderate thermophile with a growth optimum of 45 °C. It was obligately aerobic, heterotrophic and halophilic, growing in both NaCl and MgSO4 brines. The novel isolate had a polymorphic cellular morphology of short rods with occasional branching, and cells were monotrichous. The major fatty acids detected were C18 : 1, C18 : 0, C16 : 0 and C18 : cyc. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene placed the strain in the order Rhizobiales and it shared 94 % identity with the type strain of its nearest relative, Salinarimonas ramus . Morphological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic results did not affiliate the novel organism with any of the families in the Rhizobiales ; therefore, HL-109 is representative of a new lineage, for which the name Saliniramus fredricksonii gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain HL-109 (=JCM 31876=DSM 102886). In addition, examination of the phylogenetics of strain HL-109 and its nearest relatives, Salinarimonas ramus and Salinarimonas rosea , demonstrates that these halophiles form a clade distinct from the described families of the Rhizobiales . We further propose the establishment of a new family, Salinarimonadaceae fam. nov., to accommodate the genera Saliniramus and Salinarimonas (the type genus of the family).

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2018-06-01
2019-10-20
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