1887

Abstract

A novel marine sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, designated strain eps51, was isolated from a surface rock sample collected from the hydrothermal field of Suiyo Seamount on the Izu-Bonin Arc in the Western Pacific Ocean. This bacterium was Gram-staining-negative, non-motile and rod-shaped. Strain eps51 grew chemolithoautotrophically, by sulfur-oxidizing respiration with elemental sulfur and thiosulfate as electron donors and used only carbon dioxide as a carbon source. Oxygen and nitrate were used as its electron acceptors. The isolate grew optimally at 30 °C, at pH 7.0 and with 3 % NaCl. The predominant fatty acids were Cω7, Cω7 and C. The respiratory quinone was menaquinone-6 and the genomic DNA G+C content was 40.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that eps51 represented a member of the genus and the closest relative was (96.7 %). Based on its phylogenetic position along with its physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, the name sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain eps51 (=NBRC 102602=DSM 19611).

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2018-07-01
2020-01-24
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