1887

Abstract

A novel Gram-stain-negative bacterium, designated as type strain 68, was isolated from domestic sewage in Tianjin, China. Cells of strain 68 were aerobic, motile and rod-shaped. The organism grew at 15–42 °C, pH 6.0–11.0 and with 0–4 % NaCl (w/v). The DNA G+C content was 61.9 mol%. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c), summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c or C16 : 1ω6c), C16 : 0 and C12 : 0. The respiratory quinone was Q9. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and an unidentified aminophospholipid. Phylogenetic analysis based on full 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain 68 was a member of the genus Pseudomonas and showed similarities to Pseudomonas toyotomiensis HT-3 (98.58 %), Pseudomonas chengduensis MBR (98.53 %), Pseudomonas alcaliphila AL15-21 (98.44 %), Pseudomonas composti C2 (97.75 %) and Pseudomonas anguilliseptica NCIMB 1949 (97.66 %). Strain 68 exhibited low DNA–DNA hybridization homology with P. alcaliphila AL15-21 (35.40 %), P. toyotomiensis HT-3 (33.30 %), P. chengduensis MBR (35.40 %), P. anguilliseptica NCIMB 1949 (14.40 %) and P. composti C2 (20.40 %). On the basis of phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic evidence, strain 68 is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas tainjinensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 68 (=CICC 24204=KCTC 52977).

Keyword(s): domestic sewage and Pseudomonas
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2018-07-19
2019-12-06
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