1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-endospore-forming organism, isolated from the rhizosphere sand of a coastal sand dune plant was studied for its taxonomic position. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity comparisons, strain YU-PRIM-29 was grouped within the genus Halomonas and was most closely related to Halomonas johnsoniae (97.5 %). The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to other Halomonas species was <97.5 %. Strain YU-PRIM-29 grew optimally at 28 °C (growth range, 10–36 °C), at a pH of 7–9 (growth range, pH 5.5–12.0) and in the presence of 0.5 to 5 % (w/v) NaCl (growth up to 20 % NaCl). The fatty acid profile from whole-cell hydrolysates supported the allocation of the strain to the genus Halomonas . The fatty acids C18 : 1ω7c and C16 : 0 were found as major compounds, followed by the hydroxylated fatty acid C12 : 0 3-OH. The quinone system consisted predominantly of ubiquinone Q-9. The polar lipid profile was composed of the major lipids diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. In the polyamine pattern, spermidine was the predominant compound. The DNA G+C content was 64.8 mol%. In addition, the results of physiological and biochemical tests also allowed phenotypic differentiation of strain YU-PRIM-29 from its closest-related species. Hence, YU-PRIM-29 represents a new species of the genus Halomonas , for which we propose the name Halomonas malpeensis sp. nov., with YU-PRIM-29 (=LMG 28855=CCM 8737) as the type strain.

Keyword(s): Halomonas malpeensis and taxonomy
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2018-02-12
2019-10-21
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