1887

Abstract

A taxonomic study was carried out on strain 3PC125-7, which was isolated from the deep sea water of the Indian Ocean. The bacterium was rod-shaped, non-flagellated, Gram-stain-negative, oxidase- and catalase-positive and strictly aerobic. Optimal growth was observed at 25–37 °C, at pH 7 and in 1–3 % (w/v) NaCl. On the basis of the results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain 3PC125-7 represents a member of the genus with the highest sequence similarity to CL-SS4 (96.7 %), followed by H19-56 (96.7 %) and nine other species of the genus (93.5–95.8 %). The principal fatty acids of 3PC125-7 were iso-C, iso-C 3-OH and iso-CG and the sole respiratory quinone was menaquinone-6. The polar lipids comprise phosphatidylethanolamine, six unidentified phospholipids and three unknown lipids. The genomic DNA G+C content of 3PC125-7 was 41.8 mol%. Based on the phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data obtained in this study, strain 3PC125-7 is considered to represent a novel species in the genus for which the name sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain 3PC125-7 (=MCCC 1A03198=KCTC 52318).

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2018-03-01
2022-01-19
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