1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-positive, aerobic, non-motile and short-rod-shaped actinobacterium, designated THG-T121, was isolated from forest soil. Growth occurred at 10–40 °C (optimum 28–30 °C), at pH 6–8 (optimum 7) and at 0–4 % NaCl (optimum 1 %). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the nearest phylogenetic neighbours of strain THG-T121 were identified as Actinotalea ferrariae KCTC 29134 (97.9 %), Actinotalea fermentans KCTC 3251 (97.3 %), Cellulomonas carbonis KCTC 19824 (97.2 %). 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities among strain THG-T121 and other recognized species were lower than 97.0 %. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, two phosphatidylinositol mannosides, one unidentified phospholipid, three unidentified glycolipids and one unidentified lipid. The isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone (MK-10(H4)). The major fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 1 A, C16 : 0, iso-C16 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0. The whole-cell sugars of strain THG-T121 were rhamnose, ribose, mannose and glucose. The peptidoglycan type of strain THG-T121 is A4β, containing l-Orn–D-Ser–L-Asp. The DNA G+C content of strain THG-T121 was 72.4 mol%. DNA–DNA hybridization values between strain THG-T121 and A. ferrariae KCTC 29134, A. fermentans KCTC 3251 and C. carbonis KCTC 19824 were 30.2 % (27.3 %, reciprocal analysis), 28.4 %, (17.3 %) and 16.9 %, (9.3 %), respectively. On the basis of the phylogenetic analysis, chemotaxonomic data, physiological characteristics and DNA–DNA hybridization data, strain THG-T121 represents a novel species of the genus Actinotalea , for which the name Actinotalea solisilvae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is THG-T121 (=KACC 19191=CGMCC 4.7389).

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2018-01-17
2019-10-20
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