1887

Abstract

An unusual fluorescent pseudomonad was isolated from tomato exhibiting leaf spot symptoms similar to bacterial speck. Strains were fluorescent, oxidase- and arginine-dihydrolase-negative, elicited a hypersensitive reaction on tobacco and produced a soft rot on potato slices. However, the strains produced an unusual yellow, mucoid growth on media containing 5 % sucrose that is not typical of levan. Based on multilocus sequence analysis using 16S rRNA, , , and , these strains formed a distinct phylogenetic group in the genus and were most closely related to within the complex. Whole-genome comparisons, using average nucleotide identity based on blast, of representative strain GEV388 and publicly available genomes representing the genus revealed phylogroup 7 strain UASW0038 and type strain ICMP 2848 as the closest relatives with 86.59 and 86.56 % nucleotide identity, respectively. DNA–DNA hybridization using the genome-to-genome distance calculation method estimated 31.1 % DNA relatedness between GEV388 and ATCC 13223, strongly suggesting the strains are representatives of different species. These results together with Biolog GEN III tests, fatty acid methyl ester profiles and phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA and multiple housekeeping gene sequences demonstrated that this group represents a novel species member of the genus The name sp. nov. is proposed with GEV388 (=LMG 30013=ATCC TSD-90) as the type strain.

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2018-01-01
2019-12-12
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