1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile and facultative anaerobic bacterium, designated CAM-8, was isolated from an artificial fountain at Chonbuk National University, South Korea. The novel strain grew at 20–37 °C (optimum 25 °C), pH 5.5–7.0 (optimum 6.0) and with 0–2 % NaCl (optimum 0 %). Oxidase and catalase activities were positive. The cell morphology of strain CAM-8 was atypical rods 0.6–0.8 µm in width and 4.5–6.5 µm in length, with a peaked tip and sometimes a bulb shape. CAM-8 existed as single cells, and as pairs or chains of cells. The phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain CAM-8 clustered with Gemmobacter nectariphilus JCM 11959 and Gemmobacter megaterium JCM 18498 within the genus Gemmobacter . The DNA G+C content of strain CAM-8 was 65.9 mol%. The respiratory quinone was ubiquinone Q-10. The major fatty acids were C18 : 1 ω7c and/or C18 : 1 ω6c. The polar lipids of strain CAM-8 consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, two uncharacterized phospholipids, an uncharacterized aminolipid, an uncharacterized glycolipid, an uncharacterized aminophospholipid and four uncharacterized lipids. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic data, strain CAM-8 (=KACC 19224=JCM 31905) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Gemmobacter , for which the name Gemmobacter straminiformis sp. nov. is proposed.

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2017-10-12
2019-10-15
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