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Abstract

A novel bacterial strain, designated YIM 73061, was isolated from the Cholistan desert in Punjab, Pakistan, and characterized by using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the highest levels of sequence similarity with respect to FWC21 (97.6 %), FaiI3 (97.4 %), 4T-6 (97.0 %) and W2-3-4 (96.8 %). Cells were Gram-stain-negative, aerobic and motile rods that formed orange colonies. The strain was oxidase- and catalase-positive. Growth occurred at 20–40 °C (optimum, 30–37 °C) at pH 5.0–8.0 (optimum, pH 7.0) and with 0–1 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0–0.5 %). The major cellular fatty acids (>10 %) were summed feature 8 (comprising Cω7 and/or Cω6) and C The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol and four unidentified glycolipids. The major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-10 (Q-10). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 66.8 mol%. Strain YIM 73061 showed low levels of DNA–DNA relatedness to FWC21 (27.2±2.6 %), FaiI3 (24.6±1.1 %) and 4T-6 (18.4±3.1 %). On the basis of phylogenetic inference, chemotaxonomic characteristics and phenotypic data, strain YIM 73061 should be classified as representing a novel species, for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YIM 73061 (=DSM 103871=CCTCC AB 2016297).

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2017-11-01
2021-10-15
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