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Abstract

Strain WY-1, a Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped, non-motile bacterium, was isolated from the sewage treatment packing of a coking chemical plant. Strain WY-1 grew over a temperature range of 15–45 °C (optimum, 30–37 °C), a pH range of 5.5–11.0 (optimum, pH 6.5–7.0) and an NaCl concentration range of 0–3 % (w/v; optimum, 0 %). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain WY-1 was closely related to Parapedobacter indicus RK1 with the highest sequence similarity of 96.0 %. The predominant cellular fatty acids of the novel strain were iso-C15 : 0, summed feature 3(C16 : 1ω6c and/or C16 : 1ω7c), iso-C17 : 0 3-OH, iso-C17 : 1ω9c, iso-C15 : 0 3-OH and C16 : 0. The respiratory quinone of the cells was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). The main polar lipid was phosphatidylethanolamine, an unidentified phospholipid, two unidentified aminolipids and two unknown lipids. The G+C content of the DNA was 47.1 mol%. Chemotaxonomic characteristics and phylogenetic analyses revealed that strain WY-1 belonged to the genus Parapedobacter . Strain WY-1 showed a range of phenotypic characteristics that differentiated it from species of the genus Parapedobacter with validly published names, including its assimilation from carbon sources, enzyme activities and having a wider pH range for growth. Based on these results, it is concluded that strain WY-1 represents a novel species of the genus Parapedobacter , for which the name Parapedobacter defluvii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is WY-1 (=NBRC 112611=CGMCC 1.15342).

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2017-10-06
2019-10-18
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