1887

Abstract

A novel bacterial strain, designated SYL130, was isolated from the sewage sediment of a park in Busan, Korea. The strain was aerobic, producing orange colonies on R2A agar. Cells were single, Gram-stain-negative rods and were motile by gliding. Phylogenetic analyses, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, showed that strain SYL130 was most closely related to Sediminibacterium aquarii JCM 31013 (96.1 %). The major fatty acids (>5 % of the total) of strain SYL130 were iso-C15 : 0 (28.3 %), iso-C15 : 1 G (23.2 %), iso-C17 : 0 3-OH (9.6 %), anteiso-C15 : 0 (5.9 %) and iso-C16 : 0 3-OH (5.6 %). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified phospholipid, one unidentified aminolipid, two unidentified aminophospholipids and six unidentified polar lipids. The predominant respiratory quinone was MK-7. The DNA G+C content was 47.8 mol%. Strain SYL130 had clearly differential characteristics to related species including the temperature and pH ranges for growth, and being positive for l-arabinose and maltose, and negative for α-galactosidase activity. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic analyses, strain SYL130 represents a novel species of the genus Sediminibacterium , for which the name Sediminibacterium roseum sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain Sediminibacterium roseum is SYL130 (=KCTC 52860=CCTCC AB 2017082).

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.002355
2017-10-06
2019-10-22
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/ijsem/67/11/4674.html?itemId=/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.002355&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Qu JH, Yuan HL. Sediminibacterium salmoneum gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of the phylum Bacteroidetes isolated from sediment of a eutrophic reservoir. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2008; 58: 2191– 2194 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Kim YJ, Nguyen NL, Weon HY, Yang DC. Sediminibacterium ginsengisoli sp. nov., isolated from soil of a ginseng field, and emended descriptions of the genus Sediminibacterium and of Sediminibacterium salmoneum. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2013; 63: 905– 912 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Kang H, Kim H, Lee BI, Joung Y, Joh K. Sediminibacterium goheungense sp. nov., isolated from a freshwater reservoir. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2014; 64: 1328– 1333 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Kim Y, Kim B, Kang K, Ahn TY. Sediminibacterium aquarii sp. nov., isolated from sediment in a fishbowl. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2016; 66: 4501– 4505 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Fan H, Su C, Wang Y, Yao J, Zhao K et al. Sedimentary arsenite-oxidizing and arsenate-reducing bacteria associated with high arsenic groundwater from Shanyin, North western China. J Appl Microbiol 2008; 105: 529– 539 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Kim OS, Cho YJ, Lee K, Yoon SH, Kim M et al. Introducing EzTaxon-e: a prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene sequence database with phylotypes that represent uncultured species. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2012; 62: 716– 721 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Thompson JD, Gibson TJ, Plewniak F, Jeanmougin F, Higgins DG. The CLUSTAL_X windows interface: flexible strategies for multiple sequence alignment aided by quality analysis tools. Nucleic Acids Res 1997; 25: 4876– 4882 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Kimura M. A simple method for estimating evolutionary rates of base substitutions through comparative studies of nucleotide sequences. J Mol Evol 1980; 16: 111– 120 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Saitou N, Nei M. The neighbor-joining method: a new method for reconstructing phylogenetic trees. Mol Biol Evol 1987; 4: 406– 425 [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Felsenstein J. Evolutionary trees from DNA sequences: a maximum likelihood approach. J Mol Evol 1981; 17: 368– 376 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Fitch WM. Toward defining the course of evolution: minimum change for a specific tree topology. Syst Zool 1971; 20: 406– 416 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Tamura K, Peterson D, Peterson N, Stecher G, Nei M et al. MEGA5: molecular evolutionary genetics analysis using maximum likelihood, evolutionary distance, and maximum parsimony methods. Mol Biol Evol 2011; 28: 2731– 2739 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Felsenstein J. Confidence limits on phylogenies: an approach using the bootstrap. Evolution 1985; 39: 783– 791 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Wayne LG, Brenner DJ, Colwell RR, Grimont PAD, Kandler O et al. International Committee on Systematic Bacteriology. Report of the ad hoc committee on reconciliation of approaches to bacterial systematics. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1987; 37: 463– 464 [Crossref]
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Bernardet JF, Nakagawa Y, Holmes B. Subcommittee on the taxonomy of Flavobacterium and Cytophaga-like bacteria of the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes Proposed minimal standards for describing new taxa of the family Flavobacteriaceae and emended description of the family. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2002; 52: 1049– 1070 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Perry LB. Gliding motility in some non-spreading flexibacteria. J Appl Bacteriol 1973; 36: 227– 232 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Cappuccino JG, Sherman N. Microbiology: A Laboratory Manual, 6th ed. Menlo Park, CA: Benjamin/Cummings; 2002
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Smibert RM, Krieg NR. Phenotypic characterization. In Gerhardt P, Murray RGE, Wood WA, Krieg NR. (editors) Methods for General and Molecular Bacteriology Washington, DC: American Society for Microbiology; 1994; pp. 607– 654
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Prescott LM, Harley JP. The effects of chemical agents on bacteria II: antimicrobial agents (Kirby-Bauer Method). In Prescott LM, Harley JP. (editors) Laboratory Exercises in Microbiology, 5th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill; 2001; pp. 257– 262
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Mesbah M, Premachandran U, Whitman WB. Precise measurement of the G+C content of deoxyribonucleic acid by high-performance liquid chromatography. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1989; 39: 159– 167 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Minnikin DE, O'Donnell AG, Goodfellow M, Alderson G, Athalye M et al. An integrated procedure for the extraction of bacterial isoprenoid quinones and polar lipids. J Microbiol Methods 1984; 2: 233– 241 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Collins MD, Jones D. Lipids in the classification and identification of coryneform bacteria containing peptidoglycans based on 2, 4-diaminobutyric acid. J Appl Bacteriol 1980; 48: 459– 470 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Kroppenstedt RM. Fatty acid and menaquinone analysis of actinomycetes and related organisms. In Goodfellow M, Minnikin DE. (editors) Chemical Methods in Bacterial Systematics (Society for Applied Bacteriology Technical Seriesvol. 20 New York: Academic Press; 1985; pp. 173– 199
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Sasser M. Identification of Bacteria by Gas Chromatography of Cellular Fatty Acids, MIDI Technical Note 101. Newark, DE: MIDI Inc; 1990
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.002355
Loading
/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.002355
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Supplements

Supplementary File 1

PDF

Most Cited This Month

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error