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Abstract

A novel bacterial strain, designated CJ661, was isolated from soil of ginseng in Anseong, South Korea. Cells of strain CJ661 were white-coloured, Gram-staining-negative, non-motile, aerobic and rod-shaped. Strain CJ661 grew optimally at 30 °C and pH 7.0. The analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain CJ661 showed that it belongs to the genus Ramlibacter within the family Comamonadaceae and was most closely related to Ramlibacter ginsenosidimutans KCTC 22276 (98.1 %), followed by Ramlibacter henchirensis DSM 14656 (97.1 %). DNA–DNA relatedness levels of strain CJ661 were 40.6 % to R. ginsenosidimutans KCTC 22276 and 25.0 % to R. henchirensis DSM 14656. The major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone (Q-8). The predominant polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol. The major cellular fatty acids of strain CJ661 were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1 ω6c and/or C16 : 1 ω7c), C16 : 0 and summed feature 8 (C18 : 1 ω7c and/or C18 : 1 ω6c). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 65.4 mol%. On the basis polyphasic taxonomic data, strain CJ661 represents a novel species in the genus Ramlibacter , for which name Ramlibacter alkalitolerans sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is CJ661 (=KACC 19305=JCM 32081).

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2017-09-18
2019-10-15
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