1887

Abstract

Members of the class are frequently found in soils with a neutral and (slightly) basic pH where they constitute an important fraction of the microbial community. A novel representative of the class was isolated from a Ghanaian soil and was characterized in detail. Cells of strain A24_SHP_−5_238 were non-motile rods that divided by binary fission and formed orange to salmon-coloured colonies on agar plates. Strain A24_SHP_−5_238 tolerated pH values of pH 6.0–9.0 (best growth at pH 7.0–8.5) and temperature values of 8–45 °C (best growth at 33–40 °C). It grew chemo-organoheterotrophically on several sugars, a few amino acids, organic acids and different complex protein substrates. In addition, strain A24_SHP_−5_238 was able to use nitrate as an alternative electron acceptor in the absence of oxygen. Major fatty acids of A24_SHP_−5_238 were iso-C, summed feature 1 (C 3-OH/iso-C H), summed feature 3 (Cω7/C ω6), anteiso-C and anteiso-C. The major quinone was MK-8, and the DNA G+C content was 53.5 mol%. The closest described phylogenetic relatives were A22_HD_4H and Ac_23_E3 with a 16S rRNA gene sequence identity of 97.6 and 97.2 %, respectively. The DNA–DNA hybridization values (<28.5 %) confirmed that A24_SHP_−5_238 represents a novel species within the genus . Based on its morphological, physiological and molecular characteristics, we propose the novel species sp. nov. (type strain A24_SHP_−5_238 = DSM 102177 = CECT 9235).

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2017-11-01
2020-01-21
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