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Abstract

A sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, designated strain KBB12, was isolated from swinery waste collected in Jeju, Republic of Korea. The cells were Gram-stain-negative, flagellated and rod-shaped. Growth occurred at 15–45 °C (optimum, 30–37 °C), at pH 6–9 (optimum, pH 7.0) and in the presence of 0–1 % (w/v) NaCl. The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (iso-C15 : 0 2-OH and/or C16 : 1 ω7c, C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω7c. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phospholipid and an unidentified lipid. The major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-8 (Q-8) and the DNA G+C content of the genomic DNA was 69.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, showed that the novel isolate belongs to the genus Melaminivora and was most closely related to Melaminivora alkalimesophila CY1 (97.2 % similarity). The DNA–DNA relatedness values between strain KBB12 and M. alkalimesophila DSM26005 was 43.4 2.7 %. On the basis of phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, it is proposed that strain KBB12 represents a novel species of the genus Melaminivora , for which the name Melaminivora jejuensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is KBB12 (=KCTC 32230=JCM 18740).

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2017-11-07
2019-10-20
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