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Abstract

Strain 200, isolated from a soil sample taken from Antarctic tundra soil around Zhongshan Station, was found to be a Gram-stain-negative, yellow-pigmented, catalase-positive, oxidase-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped and aerobic bacterium. Strain 200 grew optimally at pH 7.0 and in the absence of NaCl on R2A. Its optimum growth temperature was 20 °C. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain 200 belonged to the genus . Strain 200 showed the highest sequence similarities to THG-DT81 (95.1 %) and KMM 3882 (95.1 %). Chemotaxonomic analysis showed that strain 200 had characteristics typical of members of the genus . Ubiquinone 10 was the predominant respiratory quinone and homospermidine was the polyamine. The major polar lipids were sphingoglycolipid, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was determined to be 60.9 mol%. Strain 200 contained C (31.6 %), summed feature 8 (comprising Cω7 and/or Cω6, 22.7 %), summed feature 3 (comprising Cω7 and/or Cω6, 11.2 %), C (7.8 %) and C 2OH (6.7 %) as the major cellular fatty acids. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, and physiological and biochemical characterization, strain 200 should be classified as representing a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 200 (=CCTCC AB 2016064=KCTC 52488).

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2017-10-01
2019-12-14
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