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Abstract

Bacterial strain HPK2-2 was isolated from soil adjacent to the caldera of Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. HPK2-2 is a chemoorganoheterotroph that shows optimal growth at 50 °C (range 45–55 °C) and pH 8.0 (range 5.0–10.0). Sequence analysis of the 16S subunit of the rRNA gene showed that HPK2-2 is most closely related to the type strain of (ATCC BAA-406), with which it shared 94.5 % sequence identity. The major fatty acids detected in HPK2-2 were C 14-methyl and C 12-methyl; internally branched fatty acids such as these are characteristic of the genus . The only respiratory quinone detected was MK-8, which is the major respiratory quinone for all members of the family examined thus far. We propose that HPK2-2 represents a novel species of the genus , for which we propose the name (type strain HPK2-2; DSM 102139; LMG 29988).

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2017-09-01
2020-01-17
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