1887

Abstract

A polyphasic approach was used to characterize an aerobic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium (designated strain CC-KL-3) isolated from a hot spring. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA genes indicated that strain CC-KL-3 showed highest sequence similarity to Hydrogenophaga bisanensis (97.7 %) and Hydrogenophaga atypica (97.6 %) and lower sequence similarity to other species (less than 97.6 %). The levels of DNA–DNA relatedness between strain CC-KL-3, H. bisanensis and H. atypica were estimated to be 13.0 and 8.7 % (the reciprocal value was 14.7 and 6.3 %). Strain CC-KL-3 was non-motile, without apparent flagella and able to grow between 15–42 °C (optimal 30 °С), pH 6.0–8.0 (optimal 7.0) and 0–2 % (w/v) NaCl (optimal 0 %). The DNA G+C content was 61.4 mol% and the major quinone system was ubiquinone (Q-8). The polyamine profile revealed the predominance of 2-hydroxyputrescine and putrescine and the dominant cellular fatty acids were C16 : 0 (28.9 %), C16 : 1ω7c/C16  : 1ω6c (41.4 %) and C18 : 1ω7c/C18  : 1ω6c (11.9 %). These data corroborated the affiliation of strain CC-KL-3 to the genus Hydrogenophaga . Based on the distinct phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic traits, and the results of comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain CC-KL-3 is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Hydrogenophaga , affiliated to the family Comamonadaceae , for which the name Hydrogenophaga aquatica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-KL-3 (=BCRC 80937=JCM 31216).

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2017-09-13
2019-10-15
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