1887

Abstract

Three strains, DHOB09, DHOC52 and DHON07, were isolated from the forest soil of Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, Guangdong Province, PR China. They were all Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped cells. The ranges (optimum) for the temperature, pH and NaCl concentration for growth of DHOB09, DHOC52 and DHON07 were 10–42 (25–28) °C, pH 5.5–9.0 (7.0–7.5) and 0–4.0 (0–0.5) % (w/v); 10–42 (28) °C, pH 4.0–7.0 (4.5–6.5) and 0–2.0 (0) % (w/v) and 10–37 (25–28) °C, pH 4.0–7.5 (5.5–6.0) and 0–2.5 (0)  % (w/v), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that DHOB09, DHOC52 and DHON07 formed a phyletic cluster with seven species of the genus within the major clade of with sequence similarities ranged from 96.9 to 98.6 %. This indicated that the three strains may represent three novel species of the genus . This result was also strongly supported by the concatenated analysis of partial B, A and A gene sequences. DNA–DNA hybridization between strains DHON07 and DHOB09, as well as DHON07 and BB4 was much lower than 70 %. The G+C content of strains DHOB09, DHOC52 and DHON07 were 59.4, 60.7 and 59.5 %, respectively. The major fatty acids of the three strains were iso-C, iso-C and iso-C and the predominant respiratory lipoquinone was ubiquinone-8. All of the physiological, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic data showed that strains DHOB09, DHOC52 and DHON07 are distinctive from each other and from all species of the genus with validly published names. Therefore, we suggest that they represent three novel species of the genus, for which the names sp. nov. (type strain DHOB09=CGMCC 1.15434=LMG 29202), sp. nov. (type strain DHOC52=NBRC 111979=KCTC 52128) and sp. nov. (type strain DHON07=CGMCC 1.15400=NBRC 111475) are proposed.

Keyword(s): Dyella , housekeeping gene and phylogeny
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2017-09-01
2020-01-25
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