1887

Abstract

A polyphasic approach was used to characterize a Gram-staining negative bacterium (designated strain CC-YHH650) isolated from agarwood chips. Strain CC-YHH650 was aerobic and rod-shaped, able to grow at 15–37 °C (optimal 30 °С), pH 6.0–8.0 (optimal 7.0) and 0–1 % (w/v) NaCl (optimal 0 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA genes revealed that strain CC-YHH650 shared highest sequence similarities with Filimonas lacunae (97.5 %), F. zeae (97.4 %), F. endophytica (97.3 %) and F. aurantiibacter (93.0 %), and lower sequence similarity with other genera (less than 93.0 %). The levels of DNA–DNA relatedness between strain CC-YTH209, F. lacunae , F. endophytica and F. zeae were estimated to be 18.3, 6.1, 24.7 % (the reciprocal values were 9.8, 8.8, 18.3 %). The major fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C15 : 1 G, C16 : 0 3-OH, iso-C17 : 0 3-OH and C16 : 1 ω7c/ C16  : 1 ω6c. The polar lipid profile contained phosphatidylethanolamine, an unidentified phospholipid, two unidentified aminophospholipids, three unidentified aminolipids and three unidentified lipids. The DNA G+C content was 46.6 mol% and the predominant quinone was menaquinone-7 (MK-7). The major polyamine was sym-homospermidine. Based on the distinct phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic traits together with results of comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain CC-YHH650 is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Filimonas , for which the name Filimonas aquilariae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-YHH650 (=BCRC 80935=JCM 31197).

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2017-08-22
2019-10-14
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