1887

Abstract

Using a newly developed culture method for not yet cultured soil bacteria, three Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-spore-forming, motile, and rod-shaped bacteria (strain designated J18, J11 and J9) were isolated from forest soil at Kyonggi University, South Korea. Isolates were subjected to a taxonomic study by using a polyphasic approach. According to a phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, strains J18, J11 and J9 belonged to the genus Massilia and clustered with Massilia haematophila CCUG 38318 (similarity range: 97.6~98.0 %). The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol, and the genomic DNA G+C contents of strains J18, J11 and J9 were 63.4, 68.7 and 64.5 mol%, respectively. The major polyamines were putrescine and 2-hydroxyputescine, which were detected in all three strains. DNA–DNA between the three tested strains and the reference strains much lower than 70 %, the recommended threshold value for the delineation of genomic species. The predominant respiratory quinine was ubiquinone-8 (Q-8) and the major cellular fatty acids were Summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω6c/C16  : 1ω7c) and C16 : 0. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic data and DNA–DNA hybridization results, the three isolates are considered to represent three novel species of the genus Massilia , for which the names Massilia solisilvae sp. nov. for type strain J18 (=KEMB 9005-366=JCM 31607), Massilia terrae sp. nov. for type strain J11 (=KEMB 9005-360=JCM 31606) and Massilia agilis sp. nov. for type strain J9 (=KEMB 9005-359=JCM 31605) are proposed.

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2017-08-18
2019-10-24
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