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Abstract

A yellow-pigmented, Gram-stain-negative, short-rod-shaped bacterial strain, MIMD3, was isolated from biological soil crusts collected in Liangcheng, north-western China. Cell growth could be observed at 10–37 °C (optimum 25 °C), at pH 5–8 (optimum 6.6) and in the presence of 1 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0 %). The genomic DNA G+C content was 65.0 mol%. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain MIMD3 shared the highest similarity with Sphingomonas vulcanisoli KCTC 42454 (95.1 %), Sphingomonas oligophenolica JCM 12082 (94.8 %), Sphingomonas mali IFO 15500 (94.5 %), Sphingomonas . leidyi ATCC 15260 (94.4 %) and Sphingomonas formosensis CC-Nfb-2 (94.3 %). The strain had Q-10 as the predominant respiratory quinone, and sym-homospermidine as the major polyamine. The major fatty acids of the strain were summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c), C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c, C14 : 0 2-OH and C16 : 0. The main polar lipids of strain MIMD3 were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and sphingoglycolipid. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic characteristics, it is concluded that strain MIMD3 represents a novel species of the genus Sphingomonas , for which the name Sphingomonas crusticola sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MIMD3 (=KCTC 42801=MCCC 1K01310).

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2017-08-18
2019-10-17
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