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Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, yellow-pigmented, non-spore-forming, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain DHOB07, was isolated from a soil sample collected from the lower subtropical forest of the Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, Guangdong Province, PR China (23° 10′ N 112° 31′ E). Strain DHOB07 grew at 10–37 °C, pH 4–7 and 0–0.5 % (w/v) NaCl, with an optimum at 28 °C, pH 5–5.5 and 0% (w/v) NaCl on R2A medium. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain formed a clade with JP1, DHG59, BB4, CS5-B2and JS12-10, with sequence similarities of 98.9, 98.0, 97.9, 97.9 and 97.8 %, respectively. Multilocus sequence analysis based on the concatenated sequences of partial housekeeping genes , and confirmed that strain DHOB07 belongs to thegenus but is distinct from all currently known species of the genus . The GC content of the genomic DNA was 58.2 mol%. The DNA–DNA relatedness value between strain DHOB07 and JP1 was 41.8 %. Iso-C, iso-C and iso-Cω9 were the major fatty acids, and ubiquinone-8 was the only respiratory quinone detected, all of which supported the affiliation of strain DHOB07 to the genus . On the basis of the polyphasic characterization results presented above, strain DHOB07 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DHOB07 (=NBRC 111473=KCTC 52132).

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2017-05-01
2020-04-02
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