1887

Abstract

A novel slowly growing, non-chromogenic species of the class was isolated from a human respiratory sample in Nebraska, USA, in 2012. Analysis of the internal transcribed spacer sequence supported placement into the genus with high sequence similarity to a previously undescribed strain isolated from a patient respiratory sample from Oregon, USA, held in a collection in Colorado, USA, in 2000. The two isolates were subjected to phenotypic testing and whole genome sequencing and found to be indistinguishable. The bacteria were acid-fast stain-positive, rod-shaped and exhibited growth after 7–10 days on solid media at temperatures ranging from 25 to 42°C. Colonies were non-pigmented, rough and slightly raised. Analyses of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight profiles showed no matches against a reference library of 130 mycobacterial species. Full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences were identical for the two isolates, the average nucleotide identity (ANI) between their genomes was 99.7 % and phylogenetic comparisons classified the novel mycobacteria as the basal most species in the slowly growing clade. is the most closely related species based on gene sequence similarity (92 %), but the ANI between the genomes was 81.5 %, below the suggested cut-off for differentiating two species (95 %). Mycolic acid profiles were more similar to than to or . The phenotypic and genomic data support the conclusion that the two related isolates represent a novel species for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NE-TNMC-100812 (=ATCC BAA-2683=DSM 46873).

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.001998
2017-08-01
2020-09-19
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/ijsem/67/8/2640.html?itemId=/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.001998&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Tortoli E. Microbiological features and clinical relevance of new species of the genus Mycobacterium. Clin Microbiol Rev 2014;27:727–752 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Tortoli E. Phylogeny of the genus Mycobacterium: many doubts, few certainties. Infect Genet Evol 2012;12:827–831 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Adékambi T, Drancourt M. Dissection of phylogenetic relationships among 19 rapidly growing Mycobacterium species by 16S rRNA, hsp65, sodA, recA and rpoB gene sequencing. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2004;54:2095–2105 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Adékambi T, Colson P, Drancourt M. rpoB-based identification of nonpigmented and late-pigmenting rapidly growing mycobacteria. J Clin Microbiol 2003;41:5699–5708 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Salfinger M, Yong PN, Godo PG, Durbin DC, Rodriguez V et al. (editors) Comparison of MALDI-TOF MS with rpoB Gene Sequencing for the Identification of Mycobacterium Species from Solid Medium Cultures. In: American Thoracic Society International Conference; D108 Diagnosis and Management of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Infections Denver, CO: American Thoracic Society; 2015
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Käser M, Ruf MT, Hauser J, Pluschke G. Optimized DNA preparation from mycobacteria. Cold Spring Harb Protoc 2010;2010:pdb.prot5408 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Goris J, Konstantinidis KT, Klappenbach JA, Coenye T, Vandamme P et al. DNA-DNA hybridization values and their relationship to whole-genome sequence similarities. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2007;57:81–91 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Gouy M, Guindon S, Gascuel O. SeaView version 4: a multiplatform graphical user interface for sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree building. Mol Biol Evol 2010;27:221–224 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Kim M, Oh HS, Park SC, Chun J. Towards a taxonomic coherence between average nucleotide identity and 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity for species demarcation of prokaryotes. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2014;64:346–351 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Bhamidi S, Shi L, Chatterjee D, Belisle JT, Crick DC et al. A bioanalytical method to determine the cell wall composition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis grown in vivo. Anal Biochem 2012;421:240–249 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Grzegorzewicz AE, Korduláková J, Jones V, Born SE, Belardinelli JM et al. A common mechanism of inhibition of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis mycolic acid biosynthetic pathway by isoxyl and thiacetazone. J Biol Chem 2012;287:38434–38441 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Barry CE, Lee RE, Mdluli K, Sampson AE, Schroeder BG et al. Mycolic acids: structure, biosynthesis and physiological functions. Prog Lipid Res 1998;37:143–179 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. CLSI Susceptibility Testing of Mycobacteria, Nocardiae, and Other Aerobic Actinomycetes; Approved Standard-Second Edition Wayne, PA: Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute; 2011
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.001998
Loading
/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.001998
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Supplements

Supplementary File 1

PDF

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error