1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, motile, rod-shaped bacterium designated OCN003 was cultivated from mucus taken from a diseased colony of the coral in Kāne‘ohe Bay, O‘ahu, Hawai‘i. Colonies of OCN003 were pale yellow, 1–3 mm in diameter, convex, smooth and entire. The strain was heterotrophic, strictly aerobic and strictly halophilic. Cells of OCN003 produced buds on peritrichous prosthecae. Growth occurred within the pH range of 5.5 to 10, and the temperature range of 14 to 39 °C. Major fatty acids were 16 : 1ω7, 16 : 0, 18 : 1ω7, 17 : 1ω8, 12 : 0 3-OH and 17 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of 1399 nucleotides of the 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequence and a multi-locus sequence analysis of three genes placed OCN003 in the genus and indicated that the nearest relatives described are , and (97–99 % sequence identity). The DNA G+C content of the strain’s genome was 40.0 mol%. Based on DNA–DNA hybridization and phenotypic differences from related type strains, we propose that OCN003 represents the type strain of a novel species in the genus , proposed as sp. nov. OCN003 (=CCOS1042=CIP 111189). An emended description of the genus is presented.

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2017-08-01
2019-12-13
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