1887

Abstract

The phytoplasma associated with witches’ broom disease of loofah [ Mill., syn. (L.) M.J. Roem.] in Taiwan was classified in group 16SrVIII, subgroup A (16SrVIII-A), based on results from actual and RFLP analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Nucleotide sequencing of PCR-amplified, cloned DNA segments revealed interoperon sequence heterogeneity in the loofah witches’ broom (LfWB) phytoplasma. Whereas the 16S–23S rRNA spacer region of contained a complete tRNA-Ile gene, the spacer of contained a nonfunctional remnant of a tRNA gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the and 16S rRNA genes revealed that the LfWB phytoplasma represented a distinct lineage within the phytoplasma clade, and the LfWB phytoplasma shared less than 97.5 % nucleotide sequence similarity of 16S rRNA genes with previously described ‘ ’ taxa. Based on unique properties of DNA, we propose recognition of loofah witches’ broom phytoplasma strain LfWB as representative of a novel taxon, ‘ luffae’.

Keyword(s): Mollicutes , mycoplasma and phytopathogen
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2017-08-01
2020-01-21
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