1887

Abstract

Strains of the genus Acinetobacter , classified as genomic species 13BJ/14TU have been previously associated with human infections and resistance to colistin. To clarify the taxonomy of this provisional group, we investigated 24 strains that have been isolated from humans since the 1960s in 10 countries. The genus-wide analysis of the rpoB and gyrB sequences of all strains and whole-genome sequences of strains representing different rpoB/gyrB genotypes showed that the 24 strains formed a distinct monophyletic group within the so-called haemolytic clade of the genus Acinetobacter . The distinctness of the group at the species level was supported by the results of the cluster analysis of the whole-cell protein fingerprints generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS. The 24 strains had very similar metabolic features and could be distinguished from other members of the genus by the combination of strong haemolytic and proteolytic activities and the ability to oxidize d-glucose and grow on phenylacetate and/or l-phenylalanine. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of the 24 strains to colistin and polymyxin B ranged from 16 to 64 mgl and from 4 to 32 mgl, respectively, so uniformly reaching the current clinical resistance breakpoint (4 mg l) for these drugs. Genus-wide comparison revealed that such a consistently high level of resistance to polymyxins is a unique feature among species of the genus Acinetobacter, which occur in humans. We conclude that genomic species 13BJ/14TU represents a biologically meaningful and medically relevant species, for which the name Acinetobacter colistiniresistens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NIPH 2036 (=CCM 8641=CIP 110478=CCUG 67966=CNCTC 7573).

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.001903
2017-07-03
2019-10-20
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/ijsem/67/7/2134.html?itemId=/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.001903&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Touchon M, Cury J, Yoon EJ, Krizova L, Cerqueira GC et al. The genomic diversification of the whole Acinetobacter genus: origins, mechanisms, and consequences. Genome Biol Evol 2014; 6: 2866– 2882 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Nemec A, Radolfova-Krizova L, Maixnerova M, Vrestiakova E, Jezek P et al. Taxonomy of haemolytic and/or proteolytic strains of the genus Acinetobacter with the proposal of Acinetobacter courvalinii sp. nov. (genomic species 14 sensu Bouvet and Jeanjean), Acinetobacter dispersus sp. nov. (genomic species 17), Acinetobacter modestus sp. nov., Acinetobacter proteolyticus sp. nov. and Acinetobacter vivianii sp. nov. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2016; 66: 1673– 1685 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Bouvet PJM, Jeanjean S. Delineation of new proteolytic genomic species in the genus Acinetobacter. Res Microbiol 1989; 140: 291– 299 [PubMed] [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Tjernberg I, Ursing J. Clinical strains of Acinetobacter classified by DNA-DNA hybridization. APMIS 1989; 97: 595– 605 [PubMed] [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Dijkshoorn L, van Harsselaar B, Tjernberg I, Bouvet PJM, Vaneechoutte M. Evaluation of amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis for identification of Acinetobacter genomic species. Syst Appl Microbiol 1998; 21: 33– 39 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Nemec A, Dijkshoorn L, Jezek P. Recognition of two novel phenons of the genus Acinetobacter among non-glucose-acidifying isolates from human specimens. J Clin Microbiol 2000; 38: 3937– 3941 [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Toh BEW, Zowawi HM, Krizova L, Paterson DL, Kamolvit W et al. Differentiation of Acinetobacter genomic species 13BJ/14TU from Acinetobacter haemolyticus by use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). J Clin Microbiol 2015; 53: 3384– 3386 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Zander E, Fernández-González A, Schleicher X, Dammhayn C, Kamolvit W et al. Worldwide dissemination of acquired carbapenem-hydrolysing class D β-lactamases in Acinetobacter spp. other than Acinetobacter baumannii. Int J Antimicrob Agents 2014; 43: 375– 377 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Lee SY, Shin JH, Park KH, Kim JH, Shin MG et al. Identification, genotypic relation, and clinical features of colistin-resistant isolates of Acinetobacter genomic species 13BJ/14TU from bloodstreams of patients in a university hospital. J Clin Microbiol 2014; 52: 931– 939 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Takizawa E, Yamada K, Oinuma K, Sato K, Niki M et al. An intrinsic strain of colistin-resistant Acinetobacter isolated from a Japanese patient. Intern Med 2016; 55: 2301– 2306 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Turton JF, Shah J, Ozongwu C, Pike R. Incidence of Acinetobacter species other than A. baumannii among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter: evidence for emerging species. J Clin Microbiol 2010; 48: 1445– 1449 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Nemec A, Dijkshoorn L. Variations in colistin susceptibility among different species of the genus Acinetobacter. J Antimicrob Chemother 2010; 65: 367– 369 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Nemec A, Musílek M, Maixnerová M, De Baere T, van der Reijden TJK et al. Acinetobacter beijerinckii sp. nov. and Acinetobacter gyllenbergii sp. nov., haemolytic organisms isolated from humans. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2009; 59: 118– 124 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Krizova L, Maixnerova M, Sedo O, Nemec A. Acinetobacter bohemicus sp. nov. widespread in natural soil and water ecosystems in the Czech Republic. Syst Appl Microbiol 2014; 37: 467– 473 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Krizova L, Maixnerova M, Sedo O, Nemec A. Acinetobacter albensis sp. nov., isolated from natural soil and water ecosystems. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2015; 65: 3905– 3912 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Nemec A, Krizova L, Maixnerova M, Sedo O, Brisse S et al. Acinetobacter seifertii sp. nov., a member of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus–Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolated from human clinical specimens. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2015; 65: 934– 942 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Radolfova-Krizova L, Maixnerova M, Nemec A. Acinetobacter pragensis sp. nov., found in soil and water ecosystems. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2016; 66: 3897– 3903 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Radolfova-Krizova L, Maixnerova M, Nemec A. Acinetobacter celticus sp. nov., a psychrotolerant species widespread in natural soil and water ecosystems. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2016; 66: 5392– 5398 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Richter M, Rosselló-Móra R. Shifting the genomic gold standard for the prokaryotic species definition. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2009; 106: 19126– 19131 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Richter M, Rosselló-Móra R, Oliver Glöckner F, Peplies J. JSpeciesWS: a web server for prokaryotic species circumscription based on pairwise genome comparison. Bioinformatics 2016; 32: 929– 931 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Šedo O, Nemec A, Křížová L, Kačalová M, Zdráhal Z. Improvement of MALDI-TOF MS profiling for the differentiation of species within the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus—Acinetobacter baumannii complex. Syst Appl Microbiol 2013; 36: 572– 578 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  22. CLSI Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing 25th Informational Supplement M100-S25 Wayne, PA: Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute; 2015
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Rosselló-Móra R, Amann R. Past and future species definitions for Bacteria and Archaea. Syst Appl Microbiol 2015; 38: 209– 216 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Juni E. Interspecies transformation of Acinetobacter: genetic evidence for a ubiquitous genus. J Bacteriol 1972; 112: 917– 931 [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Karah N, Haldorsen B, Hegstad K, Simonsen GS, Sundsfjord A et al. Species identification and molecular characterization of Acinetobacter spp. blood culture isolates from Norway. J Antimicrob Chemother 2011; 66: 738– 744 [CrossRef] [PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.001903
Loading
/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.001903
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Supplements

Supplementary File 1

PDF

Most Cited This Month

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error