1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, short-rod-shaped bacterium, motile by means of one flagellum (THG-T2.8), was isolated from the rhizosphere of Mugunghwa flower. Growth occurred at 10–37 °C (optimum 28 °C), at pH 6–8 (optimum 7) and with 0–5 % NaCl (optimum 1 %). The major quinone was ubiquinone-10 (Q-10). The major fatty acids were C10 : 0 3-OH, C16 : 0, C18 : 0 and C18 : 1 ω7c. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmethylethanolamine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, one unidentified aminolipid, two unknown phospholipids, one unknown glycolipid and one unidentified lipid. The DNA G+C content of strain THG-T2.8 was 65.5 mol%. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the nearest phylogenetic neighbours of strain THG-T2.8 were identified as Paracoccus tibetensis Tibet-S9a3 (98.6 %), Paracoccus aestuarii B7 (98.4 %), Paracoccus rhizosphaerae CC-CCM15-8 (98.3 %) and Paracoccus beibuensis JLT1284 (98.2 %). Levels of sequence similarity among strain THG-T2.8 and other species of the genus Paracoccus were lower than 98.0 %. DNA–DNA hybridization values between strain THG-T2.8 and P. tibetensis Tibet-S9A3T, P. aestuarii B7, P. rhizosphaerae CC-CCM15-8 and P. beibuensis JLT1284 were 36.5 % (38.8 %, reciprocal analysis), 32.8 % (34.8 %), 31.6 % (33.8 %) and 15.3 % (24.8 %), respectively. On the basis of the phylogenetic analysis, chemotaxonomic data, physiological characteristics and DNA–DNA hybridization data, strain THG-T2.8 represents a novel species of the genus Paracoccus , for which the name Paracoccus hibisci sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is THG-T2.8 (=KACC 18932=CCTCC AB 2016181).

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2017-06-09
2019-08-22
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