1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, aerobic and rod-shaped bacterium, strain Ra1, was isolated from the gut of a wood-feeding lower termite, . Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain was closely related to JCM 18078 (96.7 % similarity). Growth was observed at 15–45 °C (optimum 30 °C), at pH 6.0–9.0 (optimum pH 8.0) and in the presence of 0–2 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0 %). The DNA G+C content of strain Ra1 was 39.9 mol%. Cells contained menaquinone MK-6 as the sole respiratory quinone and the major fatty acids were iso-C, iso-C, summed feature 3 (comprising Cω6 and/or Cω7) and summed feature 9 (comprising C 10-methyl and/or iso-Cω9). The predominant polyamine was homospermidine. The cellular polar lipids consisted of one phosphatidylethanolamine, three unidentified aminolipids, one unidentified phospholipid and one unidentified lipid. Based on phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic studies, it is concluded that strain Ra1 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Ra1 (=CCTCC AB 2015431=KCTC 52230).

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2017-06-01
2019-12-15
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