1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped (1.4–3.6×0.4–0.6 µm) and motile marine bacterium, designated as MEBiC09124, was isolated from tidal flat sediment of Suncheon Bay, South Korea. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain MEBiC09124 showed high similarity to Oleiagrimonas soli 3.5X (96.7 %). Growth was observed at 18–38 °C (optimum 30 °C), at pH 4.0–8.5 (optimum pH 7.5) and with 0–6 % (w/v) (optimum 2.5 %) NaCl. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C16 : 0, iso-C17 : 0 and summed feature 9 (comprising 10-methyl C16 : 0 and/or iso-C17 : 1ω9c). The DNA G+C content was 66.1 mol%. The major respiratory quinone was Q-8. Biochemical characteristics such as production of acetoin and enzyme activities of trypsin, α-chymotrypsin and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase differentiated strain MEBiC09124 from O. soli 3.5X. On the basis of data from this polyphasic taxonomic study, strain MEBiC09124 (=KCCM 43131=JCM 30904) is classified as the type strain of a novel species in the genus Oleiagrimonas , for which the name Oleiagrimonas citrea sp. nov. is proposed. Emended descriptions of the genus Oleiagrimonas and Oleiagrimonas soli are also given.

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2017-06-09
2019-10-19
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