1887

Abstract

A novel strain, G25, was isolated from desert soil collected near Jeddah in Saudi Arabia. The strain could accumulate nearly 65 % of its cell dry weight as fatty acids, grow on a broad range of carbon sources and tolerate temperatures of up to 50 °C. With respect to to its 16S rRNA gene sequence, G25 is most closely related to Streptomyces massasporeus DSM 40035, Streptomyces hawaiiensis DSM 40042, Streptomyces indiaensis DSM 43803, Streptomyces luteogriseus DSM 40483 and Streptomyces purpurascens DSM 40310. Conventional DNA–DNA hybridization (DDH) values ranged from 18.7 to 46.9 % when G25 was compared with these reference strains. Furthermore, digital DDH values between the draft genome sequence of G25 and the genome sequences of other species of the genus Streptomyces were also significantly below the threshold of 70 %. The DNA G+C content of the draft genome sequence, consisting of 8.46 Mbp, was 70.3 %. The prevalent cellular fatty acids of G25 comprised anteiso-C15 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0. The predominant menaquinones were MK-9(H6), MK-9(H8) and MK-9(H4). The polar lipids profile contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol mannosides as well as unidentified phospholipids and phosphoaminolipids. The cell wall contained ll-diaminopimelic acid. Whole-cell sugars were predominantly glucose with small traces of ribose and mannose. The results of the polyphasic approach confirmed that this isolate represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces , for which the name Streptomyces jeddahensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of this species is G25 (=DSM 101878 =LMG 29545 =NCCB 100603).

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2017-06-20
2019-10-20
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