1887

Abstract

Strain NP1, a Gram-stain-negative, orange, rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from hexacholorocyclohexane (HCH)-contaminated soil sediment samples collected from Ummari village, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India. The results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that NP1 clustered with members of the genus of the order , family and phylum The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with type strains of members of the genus ranged from 98.57 to 93.95 % with JC-130 (98.57 %), X14-1 (97.82 %), YKTF-7 (97.42 %) and W-14 (97.01 %) as the closest neighbours. Cells of NP1 were aerobic, motile and oxidase- and catalase-positive. NP1 was capable of hydrolysis of gelatin, aesculin and starch and reduced nitrates to nitrogen. The major fatty acids of NP1 were summed feature 4 and iso-C. The polar lipid profile of NP1 showed the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), unknown glycolipids and unknown aminolipids. Menaquinone-7 (MK-7) was the predominant respiratory quinone and homospermidine was found to be the predominant polyamine in NP1. The DNA G+C content of NP1 was 52.1±0.7 mol%. The levels of DNA–DNA relatedness of NP1 to JC-130, X14-1, YKTF-7 and W14 were 44.9±0.6 %, 40.5±0.4 %, 34.4±0.7 % and 33.4±0.5 % respectively. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, physiological and biochemical evidence and DNA–DNA hybridization results, it is proposed that NP1 represents a novel species of the genus for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NP1 (KCTC 42943=CCM 8697=MCC 2931).

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2017-05-01
2020-01-18
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