1887

Abstract

Bacterial strains 4M-Z03, 4M-K16 and DHG59 were isolated from forest soil samples collected from the Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, Guangdong Province, PR China (112° 31′ E 23° 10′ N). The three strains grew well at 28 °C, pH 5.0–6.0 on R2A medium. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the three strains, together with DHG40, formed a distinct phyletic clade within the genus , and the sequence similarities between any strains of the clade ranged from 97.8 to 98.5 %. Sequence analysis of concatenated partial , and gene sequences also strongly suggested that the three strains represented three novel species of the genus . The respiratory lipoquinone of the three strains was ubiquinone-8, and their DNA G+C content was 58.2–59.0 mol%. The fatty acid profiles differed substantially among these three strains, although they had two common major fatty acids, iso-C and iso-Cω9. The DNA–DNA relatedness among the three strains and the type strains of the closest species of the genus examined was lower than 50 %. The results of genotypic and phenotypic characterization presented above demonstrate that the three strains examined represent three novel species of the genus , for which the names sp. nov. (type strain 4M-Z03=NBRC 111980=KCTC 52131), sp. nov. (type strain 4M-K16=NBRC 111981=KCTC 52130) and sp. nov. (type strain DHG59=NBRC 111472=LMG 29201=CGMCC 1.15439) are proposed.

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2017-03-01
2019-12-12
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