1887

Abstract

A yellowish-orange-pigmented marine bacterium, designated MEBiC08714 was isolated from a sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius collected at the west edge of the East Sea of Korea. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that MEBiC08714 was affiliated with the genus Echinicola and that the strain was most closely related to Echinicola vietnamensis KCTC 12713 (96.9 %), followed by ‘ Echinicola shivajiensis ’ JCM 17847 (96.3 %), Echinicola jeungdonensis KCTC 23122 (96.1 %), and Echinicola pacifica KCTC 12368 (95.0 %). Cells were strictly aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod shaped, flexirubin-type pigments-negative and motile by gliding. Growth was observed at 20–35 °C (optimum 25 °C), at pH 6–11 (optimum pH 7.0), and with 0–13 % NaCl (optimum 2 %). This strain was able to hydrolyze agar and starch. The polar lipids of MEBiC08714 contained phosphatidylethanolamine, an unidentified phospholipid, and four unidentified lipids. The major fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0 (27.5 %), iso-C17 : 0 3-OH (11.5 %), anteiso-C15 : 0 (5.2 %), summed feature 3 (C16:1ω7c and/or C16:1ω6c, 20.3 %) and summed feature 9 (iso-C17 : 1ω9c and/or10-methyl C16 : 06, 6.3 %). The DNA G+C content was 44.2 mol% and the major respiratory quinone was MK-7. On the basis of these polyphasic taxonomic data, MEBiC08714 represents a novel species of the genus Echinicola , for which the name Echinicola strongylocentroti sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MEBiC08714 (=KCTC 52052=JCM 31307).

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2017-04-03
2019-10-14
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