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Abstract

A thermophilic, anaerobic, fermentative bacterium, strain A6, was obtained from an anaerobic batch digester treating animal manure and rice straw. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, slightly curved rods with a size of 0.6–1×2.5–8.2 µm, non-motile and produced terminal spores. The temperature, pH and NaCl concentration ranges for growth were 40–60 °C, 6.5–8.0 and 0–15.0 g l, with optimum growth noted at 50–55 °C, pH 7.5 and in the absence of NaCl, respectively. Yeast extract was required for growth. d-Glucose, maltose, d-xylose, d-galactose, d-fructose, d-ribose, lactose, raffinose, sucrose, d-arabinose, cellobiose, d-mannose and yeast extract were used as carbon and energy sources. The fermentation products from glucose were ethanol, lactate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, iso-butyrate, iso-valerate, H2 and CO2. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 36.6 mol%. The predominant fatty acids were C16 : 0, iso-C17 : 1, C14 : 0, C16 : 1 ω7c, C16 : 0 N-alcohol and C13 : 0 3-OH. Respiratory quinones were not detected. The polar lipid profile comprised phosphoglycolipids, phospholipids, glycolipids, a diphosphatidylglycerol, a phosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified lipid. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the strain was closely related to Defluviitalea saccharophila DSM 22681 with a similarity of 96.0 %. Based on the morphological, physiological and taxonomic characterization, strain A6 is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Defluviitalea , for which the name Defluviitalea raffinosedens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is A6 (=DSM 28090=ACCC 19951).

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2017-05-09
2019-10-19
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