1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, yellow-pigmented, flexirubin-producing, rod-shaped and endophytic bacterium, designated strain CC-YTH209, was isolated from a maize leaf and subjected to a taxonomic study. Strain CC-YTH209 was found to grow at 15–40 °C (optimal 30 °C), at pH 6.0–8.0 (optimal pH 7.0) and in the presence of 0–2 % (optimal 1 %) (w/v) NaCl. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain CC-YTH209 appeared to belong to the genus Chryseobacterium within the class Flavobacteriia , and was closely related to Chryseobacterium rigui CJ16 (97.5 % similarity) and Chryseobacterium taeanense PHA3-4 (96.9 %). The level of DNA–DNA relatedness between strain CC-YTH209 and Chryseobacterium rigui CJ16 was 14.4 % (reciprocal, 13.0 %). Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA genes revealed a distinct taxonomic position attained by strain CC-YTH209 within the clade that accommodated Chryseobacterium species. The DNA G+C content was 37.2 mol%. Strain CC-YTH209 contained menaquinone MK-6 as the predominant respiratory quinone and sym-homospermidine as the major polyamine. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0 3-OH and C16 : 1 ω6c/C16  : 1 ω7c. The polar lipid profile comprised phosphatidylethanolamine and five aminolipids, three lipids, one glycolipid, one aminophospholipid and one phospholipid, which are presently uncharacterized. On the basis of evidence presented in this study, strain CC-YTH209 is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Chryseobacterium , for which the name Chryseobacterium endophyticum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-YTH209 (=BCRC 80938=JCM 31226).

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.001656
2017-04-03
2019-10-20
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/ijsem/67/3/570.html?itemId=/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.001656&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Vandamme P, Bernardet J-F, Segers P, Kersters K, Holmes B. New perspectives in the classification of the flavobacteria: description of Chryseobacterium gen. nov., Bergeyella gen. nov., and Empedobacter nom. rev. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1994;44:827–831 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Young CC, Kämpfer P, Shen FT, Lai WA, Arun AB. Chryseobacterium formosense sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere of Lactuca sativa L. (garden lettuce). Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2005;55:423–426 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Bernardet J-F, Bruun B, Hugo C. The genera Chryseobacterium and Elizabethkingia. In Dworkin M, Falkow S, Rosenberg E, Schleifer K-H, Stackebrandt E. et al. (editors) The Prokaryotes, 3rd ed.vol. 7 New York: Springer; 2006; pp.638–676[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Kämpfer P, Vaneechoutte M, Lodders N, De Baere T, Avesani V et al. Description of Chryseobacterium anthropi sp. nov. to accommodate clinical isolates biochemically similar to Kaistella koreensis and Chryseobacterium haifense, proposal to reclassify Kaistella koreensis as Chryseobacterium koreense comb. nov. and emended description of the genus Chryseobacterium. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2009;59:2421–2428 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Wu YF, Wu QL, Liu SJ. Chryseobacterium taihuense sp. nov., isolated from a eutrophic lake, and emended descriptions of the genus Chryseobacterium, Chryseobacterium taiwanense, Chryseobacterium jejuense and Chryseobacterium indoltheticum. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2013;63:913–919 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Nguyen NL, Kim YJ, Hoang VA, Yang DC. Chryseobacterium ginsengisoli sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere of ginseng and emended description of Chryseobacterium gleum. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2013;63:2975–2980 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Montero-Calasanz MC, Göker M, Rohde M, Spröer C, Schumann P et al. Chryseobacterium hispalense sp. nov., a plant-growth-promoting bacterium isolated from a rainwater pond in an olive plant nursery, and emended descriptions of Chryseobacterium defluvii, Chryseobacterium indologenes, Chryseobacterium wanjuense and Chryseobacterium gregarium. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2013;63:4386–4395 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Montero-Calasanz MC, Göker M, Rohde M, Spröer C, Schumann P et al. Chryseobacterium oleae sp. nov., an efficient plant growth promoting bacterium in the rooting induction of olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cuttings and emended descriptions of the genus Chryseobacterium, C. daecheongense, C. gambrini, C. gleum, C. joostei, C. jejuense, C. luteum, C. shigense, C. taiwanense, C. ureilyticum and C. vrystaatense. Syst Appl Microbiol 2014;37:342–350 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Lin SY, Hameed A, Wen CZ, Liu YC, Shen FT et al. Chryseobacterium echinoideorum sp. nov., isolated from sea urchins (Tripneustes gratilla). Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2015;65:3985–3990 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Loch TP, Faisal M. Chryseobacterium aahli sp. nov., isolated from lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and brown trout (Salmo trutta), and emended descriptions of Chryseobacterium ginsenosidimutans and Chryseobacterium gregarium. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2014;64:1573–1579 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Kämpfer P, McInroy JA, Glaeser SP. Chryseobacterium zeae sp. nov., Chryseobacterium arachidis sp. nov., and Chryseobacterium geocarposphaerae sp. nov. isolated from the rhizosphere environment. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 2014;105:491–500 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Chen XY, Zhao R, Chen ZL, Liu L, Li XD et al. Chryseobacterium polytrichastri sp. nov., isolated from a moss (Polytrichastrum formosum), and emended description of the genus Chryseobacterium. Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 2015;107:403–410 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Guo W, Li J, Shi M, Yuan K, Li N et al. Chryseobacterium montanum sp. nov. isolated from mountain soil. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2016;66:4051–4056 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Wen CF, Xi LX, Zhao S, Hao ZX, Luo L et al. Chryseobacterium chengduensis sp. nov. isolated from the air of captive giant panda enclosures in Chengdu, China. J Zhejiang Univ Sci B 2016;17:610–618 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Wang YN, He WH, An ML, Tian WY, You XY et al. Chryseobacterium zhengzhouense sp. nov., isolated from groundwater of the well in a vegetable field, and emended description of the genus Chryseobacterium. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 2016;109:1299–1306 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Gyaneshwar P, James EK, Mathan N, Reddy PM, Reinhold-Hurek B et al. Endophytic colonization of rice by a diazotrophic strain of Serratia marcescens. J Bacteriol 2001;183:2634–2645 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Edwards U, Rogall T, Blöcker H, Emde M, Böttger EC. Isolation and direct complete nucleotide determination of entire genes. Characterization of a gene coding for 16S ribosomal RNA. Nucleic Acids Res 1989;17:7843–7853 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Heiner CR, Hunkapiller KL, Chen SM, Glass JI, Chen EY. Sequencing multimegabase-template DNA with BigDye terminator chemistry. Genome Res 1998;8:557–561[PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Tamura K, Stecher G, Peterson D, Filipski A, Kumar S. MEGA6: molecular evolutionary genetics analysis version 6.0. Mol Biol Evol 2013;30:2725–2729 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Thompson JD, Gibson TJ, Plewniak F, Jeanmougin F, Higgins DG. The CLUSTAL_X windows interface: flexible strategies for multiple sequence alignment aided by quality analysis tools. Nucleic Acids Res 1997;25:4876–4882 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Saitou N, Nei M. The neighbor-joining method: a new method for reconstructing phylogenetic trees. Mol Biol Evol 1987;4:406–425[PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Felsenstein J. Evolutionary trees from DNA sequences: a maximum likelihood approach. J Mol Evol 1981;17:368–376 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Fitch WM. Toward defining the course of evolution: minimum change for a specific tree topology. Syst Zool 1971;20:406–416 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Felsenstein J. Confidence limits on phylogenies: an approach using the bootstrap. Evolution 1985;39:783–791 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Kim OS, Cho YJ, Lee K, Yoon SH, Kim M et al. Introducing EzTaxon-e: a prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene sequence database with phylotypes that represent uncultured species. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2012;62:716–721 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Seldin L, Dubnau D. Deoxyribonucleic acid homology among Bacillus polymyxa, Bacillus macerans, Bacillus azotofixans, and other nitrogen-fixing Bacillus strains. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1985;35:151–154 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Wayne LG, Brenner DJ, Colwell RR, Grimont PAD, Kandler O et al. International Committee on Systematic Bacteriology. Report of the ad hoc committee on reconciliation of approaches to bacterial systematics. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1987;37:463–464[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Mesbah M, Premachandran U, Whitman WB. Precise measurement of the G+C content of deoxyribonucleic acid by high-performance liquid chromatography. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1989;39:159–167 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Bernardet J-F, Hugo C, Bruun B. Genus VII. Chryseobacterium Vandamme, et al. 1994. In Krieg NR, Ludwig W, Whitman WB, Hedlund BP, Paster BJ. et al. (editors) Bergey’s Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, 2nd ed.vol. 4 New York: Springer; 2011; pp.180–196
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Murray RGE, Doetsch RN, Robinow CF. Determination and cytological light microscopy. In Gerhardt P, Murray RGE, Wood WA, Krieg NR. (editors) Methods for General and Molecular Bacteriology Washington, DC: American Society for Microbiology; 1994; pp.32–34
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Bernardet JF, Nakagawa Y, Holmes B.Subcommittee on the taxonomy of Flavobacterium and Cytophaga-like bacteria of the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes Proposed minimal standards for describing new taxa of the family Flavobacteriaceae and emended description of the family. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2002;52:1049–1070 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Lin SY, Liu YC, Hameed A, Hsu YH, Lai WA et al. Azospirillum fermentarium sp. nov., a nitrogen-fixing species isolated from a fermenter. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2013;63:3762–3768 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Hameed A, Shahina M, Lin SY, Lai WA, Hsu YH et al. Aquibacter zeaxanthinifaciens gen. nov., sp. nov., a zeaxanthin-producing bacterium of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from surface seawater, and emended descriptions of the genera Aestuariibaculum and Gaetbulibacter. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2014;64:138–145 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Miller LT. Single derivatization method for routine analysis of bacterial whole-cell fatty acid methyl esters, including hydroxy acids. J Clin Microbiol 1982;16:584–586[PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Paisley R. MIS Whole Cell Fatty Acid Analysis by Gas Chromatography Training Manual Newark, DE: MIDI; 1996
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Sasser M. Identification of Bacteria by Gas Chromatography of Cellular Fatty Acids, MIDI Technical Note 101 Newark, DE: MIDI Inc; 1990
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Minnikin DE, O'Donnell AG, Goodfellow M, Alderson G, Athalye M et al. An integrated procedure for the extraction of bacterial isoprenoid quinones and polar lipids. J Microbiol Methods 1984;2:233–241 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Scherer P, Kneifel H. Distribution of polyamines in methanogenic bacteria. J Bacteriol 1983;154:1315–1322[PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Collins MD. Isoprenoid quinone analysis in classification and identification. In Goodfellow M, Minnikin DE. (editors) Chemical Methods in Bacterial Systematics London: Academic Press; 1985; pp.267–287
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Kim KK, Lee KC, Oh HM, Lee JS. Chryseobacterium aquaticum sp. nov., isolated from a water reservoir. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2008;58:533–537 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.001656
Loading
/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.001656
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Supplements

Supplementary File 1

PDF

Most Cited This Month

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error