1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, moderately halophilic, motile bacterium, designated strain CP12, was isolated from a crystallizing pond of a saltern of the Yellow Sea in Korea. Cells of strain CP12 were non-spore-forming rods and produced whitish-yellow colonies. Growth was observed at 10–37 °C (optimum 37 °C), at pH 6.0–9.0 (optimum pH 7.0), and in the presence of 0.5–20 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain CP12 was closely related to Marinobacter flavimaris SW-145 (98.4 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Marinobacter algicola DG893 (98.2 %), Marinobacter adhaerens HP15 (98.2 %), Marinobacter salsuginis SD-14B (97.9 %), Marinobacter salarius R9SW1 (97.6 %) and Marinobacter lipolyticus SM19 (97.1 %). DNA–DNA hybridization studies showed values lower than 18.6 % between strain CP12 and any of these species. The predominant respiratory isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-9 and the major cellular fatty acids of strain CP12 were C16 : 0, C12 : 0 3-OH, C12 : 0, Summed feature 3, C16 : 0 10-methyl and C18 : 1 ω9c. On the basis of phenotypic properties, and phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic data, it is evident that strain CP12 represents a novel species of the genus Marinobacter , for which the name Marinobacter halotolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CP12 (=KACC 18381=NBRC 110910).

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2017-03-16
2019-10-23
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