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Abstract

A novel endophytic actinobacterial strain, designated EGI 6500195, was isolated from fruits of Capparis spinosa. Growth occurred at 10–45 °C (optimum 30 °C), at pH 6–8 (optimum pH 7) and in the presence of 0–1 % (w/v) NaCl. Strain EGI 6500195 shared highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (97.74 %) with Streptomyces vitaminophilus DSM 41686 and less than 97 % sequence similarity with other members of the genus Streptomyces . The diagnostic amino acid in the peptidoglycan was ll-diaminopimelic acid. Whole-cell hydrolysates contained glucose, ribose, fructose and mannose. The predominant menaquinones were MK-9(H6) and MK-9(H8). The polar lipid profile of strain EGI 6500195 included diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmethylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylcholine, three unknown phospholipids, an unknown aminophospholipid and an unknown aminolipid. The cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, iso-C16 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 1 ω9c, summed feature 4 (iso-C17 : 1 I and/or anteiso-C17 : 1 B) and iso-C17 : 1 ω9c. The DNA G+C content of strain EGI 6500195 was 74.1 mol%. The level of DNA–DNA relatedness between strain EGI 6500195 and Streptomyces. vitaminophilus DSM 41686 was 14.1±3.5 %. On the basis of the phenotypic, phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and DNA–DNA hybridization data, strain EGI 6500195 represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces , for which the name Streptomyces capparidis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is EGI 6500195 (=DSM 42145=JCM 30089).

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2017-02-20
2019-12-11
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