1887

Abstract

A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, spore-forming and moderately thermophilic bacterium, strain KWC4, was isolated from a composting reactor. Cells of strain KWC4 were 2.0–5.0 μm long and 0.5–0.7 μm in diameter. Strain KWC4 grew aerobically at 32–61 °C, with optimal growth occurring at 50 °C. It grew at pH 5.6–10.1, with optimal growth at around pH 9.0. The optimum NaCl concentration for growth was almost 0 % (w/v), but strain KWC4 was moderately halotolerant and was able to grow at NaCl concentrations up to 4.4 % (w/v). The DNA G+C content of strain KWC4 was 60.0 mol%. The major fatty acids were iso-16 : 0 (39.0 %) and anteiso-15 : 0 (33.3 %). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity data, strain KWC4 belonged to the genus and was related to . However, strain KWC4 had a 38 bp insertion sequence located near the 3′ end of its 16S rRNA gene that was not present in . The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity value between strain KWC4 and was 95.7 %. The DNA–DNA hybridization value between strain KWC4 and strain XE was 66 %. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic evidence, strain KWC4 (=DSM 18247=JCM 13945) is the type strain of a novel species, for which the name sp. nov. is proposed.

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2007-07-01
2021-10-16
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