1887

Abstract

Three anaerobic, moderately thermophilic, syntrophic primary alcohol- and lactate-degrading microbes, designated strains JL, JE and OL, were isolated from sludges of thermophilic (55 °C) digesters that decomposed either municipal solid wastes or sewage sludge. The strains were strictly anaerobic organisms. All three strains grew at 25–60 °C and pH 5.5–8.5 and optimum growth was observed at 45–50 °C and pH 6.0–7.0. The three organisms grew chemo-organotrophically on a number of carbohydrates in the presence of yeast extract. In co-culture with the hydrogenotrophic methanogen , all strains could utilize ethanol, glycerol and lactate syntrophically for growth, although these compounds were not metabolized in pure culture without additional external electron acceptors. All strains could reduce thiosulphate. Quinones were not detected. The DNA G+C contents of strains JL, JE and OL were 38.0, 37.3 and 37.7 mol%, respectively. Major cellular fatty acids of the strains were iso-C, C and unsaturated species of C. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the strains belong to a deeply branched lineage of the phylum ; the most closely related species was (16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 88 %). The three strains were phylogenetically very closely related to each other (99–100 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and were physiologically and chemotaxonomically similar. These genetic and phenotypic properties suggest that the strains should be classified as representatives of a novel species and genus; the name gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of is strain JL (=JCM 12098=NBRC 100060=DSM 15584).

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2006-07-01
2019-10-23
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vol. , part 7, pp. 1621 - 1629

Photomicrographs of strain JE (top) and strain OL (bottom). Strains were cultivated anaerobically with sucrose and yeast extract at 45 °C. Bars, 10 µm.



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