1887

Abstract

A novel thermophilic, sulfur-oxidizing Gram-negative bacterium, designated strain SS-5, was isolated from the Calcite Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park, USA. The cells were motile rods (1·2–2·8 μm long and 0·6–0·8 μm wide). The new isolate was a facultative heterotroph capable of using elemental sulfur or thiosulfate as an electron donor and O (1–18 %; optimum 6 %, v/v) as an electron acceptor. Hydrogen did not support growth. The isolate grew autotrophically with CO. In addition, strain SS-5 utilized various organic carbon sources such as yeast extract, tryptone, sugars, amino acids and organic acids. Growth was observed between 55 and 78 °C (optimum 70 °C; 3·5 h doubling time), pH 6·0 and 8·0 (optimum pH 7·5), and 0 and 0·6 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0 %). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 32 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the isolate was a member of the genus . On the basis of the physiological and molecular characteristics of the new isolate, we propose the name sp. nov. with SS-5 (=JCM 12773=OCM 840) as the type strain. In addition, emended descriptions of the genus , and are proposed.

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2005-11-01
2019-10-21
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Effects of temperature (a), pH (b), NaCl concentration (c) and O concentration (d) on the growth of SS-5 . Growth curves at different temperatures were determined in mjTSO medium at pH 7.5. The effect of pH and NaCl on growth was determined in mjTSO medium containing various buffers and concentrations at 70 C.

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Sulfate production was measured during growth using HPLC with a Shim-pack IC column (Shimadzu). mjTSO medium lacking thiosulfate and all sulfate-containing salts was used. Growth curve (circles) and production of sulfate (squares) are shown. Numbers in parentheses indicate the pH of the medium measured with a compact pH meter (Horiba B-212).

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