1887

Abstract

Heterotrophic bacteria isolated from water samples taken from Hiroshima Bay, Japan, and referred to as (Dinophyceae) cyst formation-promoting bacteria, were assigned to the group within the - on the basis of nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequences. Phylogenetic analyses showed that two strains, CFPB-A9 and CFPB-A5, are closely related to each other and that their closest relative was (95·9 % sequence similarity). These strains were Gram-negative, motile, obligately aerobic rods that required sodium ions and 2–7 % sea salts for growth and did not produce bacteriochlorophyll . Their optimal growth temperature was 25–30 °C. The strains had Q-10 as the dominant respiratory quinone. Primary cellular fatty acid in both strains was 18 : 17. The DNA G+C contents of strains CFPB-A9 and CFPB-A5 were 59·1 and 59·2 mol%, respectively. Based on physiological, biological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, the strains are considered to represent a novel species, sp. nov., with type strain CFPB-A9 (=LMG 22015=NBRC 100362).

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2004-09-01
2020-01-29
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vol. , part 5, pp. 1687–1692

Fatty acid profiles for strains CFPB-A9 and CFPB-A5 are available to download. [PDF](130KB)



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